Information Guides:

Hardcopies available free of charge. Email info@adainsights.org to get a copy.

ADA Guide | Information Briefs | Myths and Facts about the ADA | Checklist

ADA Guide:

The ADA and You: What to do When an Employer Discriminates Against You Because of Your Disability:
by: Kathryn Moss, Ph.D., Leah M. Ranney, Ph.D., Carol Gunther-Mohr, M.A.

ADA Guide: view as pdf version

ADA Guide: view as text

La ADA y Usted: Spanish version (en espanol)

ADA Guide: view as images

A woman in a wheelchair sitting at a desk working on her computer. NEXT...


image: section break

Information Briefs:

Information Brief 1 - ADA Employment Discrimination Administrative Charges
How Well Does the System Work?
June 20, 2001
Kathryn Moss, Ph.D. Michael Ullman, M.A., Scott Burris, J.D., Matthew Johnsen, Ph.D., and Jeffrey Swanson, Ph.D.

Read in pdf format


Information Brief 2 - In Search of a Solution to Disability-Based Employment Discrimination
September 25, 2001
Kathryn Moss, Ph.D., Michael Ullman, M.A., Scott Burris, J.D., Matthew Johnsen, Ph.D., and Jeffrey Swanson, Ph.D.

Read in pdf format


Information Brief 3 - ADA Title I Enforcement and People with HIV/AIDS August 27, 2002
Kathryn Moss, Ph.D., Leah M. Ranney, Ph.D., Carol Gunther-Mohr, M.A.

Read in pdf format


image: section break

Myths and Facts about the ADA:

Myth: Going to the EEOC or a state or local fair employment practice agency (FEPA) is a waste of time if you have a disability-based employment discrimination complaint.

Fact: Many people are filing administrative complaints, but inadequate resources in these offices mean that only a small percentage of the complaints bring benefits to complainants. Filing an administrative complaint is not a waste of time, however. You need to file an administrative complaint before you can file a lawsuit in court.


Myth: Filing a lawsuit is a waste of time if you have a disability-based employment discrimination complaint.

Fact: Most employment discrimination lawsuits that end in judicial opinions or jury verdicts benefit employers, not people with disabilities. However, only a small percentage of cases are decided by judicial opinion or jury verdict. Our data show that once a lawsuit is filed, over half of the employers named in complaints will settle the claims out of court.


Myth: The ADA is failing.

Fact: A string of court decisions have denied claims by people with disabilities. However, not only are many people who are filing ADA lawsuits receiving settlements from their claims, but also anecdotal information indicates that many employers are complying with the law without any claim being filed against them.

Individuals who believe they have experienced disability-discrimination have a right to file an administrative complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or a state or local Fair Employment Practices Agency. (They may also file a lawsuit, but first they must file an administrative complaint.)


image: section break


Checklist for Filing an Employment Discrimination Administrative Charge:

To file a charge, you need to go to, call, or write the nearest EEOC office or state or local Fair Employment Practices Agency. Here are some tips for filing your charge.



section break


ADA Insights: Keeping the Spirit of the ADA Alive

Contact us at: info@adainsights.org
© Copyrighted 2002 by ADA Insights.

This website meets the U.S. Section 508 Guidelines for web accessibility for people with disabilities.
For more information, read our accessiblity statement.